Educational Diversity Curriculum Offer 2017 / 18

Educational Diversity caters for students across KS2 through to KS4, providing a curriculum in line with the National Curriculum. We work with a range of students for a variety of different reasons:

Pupils who have been excluded from schools

Those at risk of exclusion

Students accessing medical treatment

School phobic children.

Depending on their needs, students will study at one of 5 centres:

Pegasus - KS2 and 3

Oracle - KS4

Athena - KS3 and 4

Chrysalis - KS3 and 4

Atlas - KS4

Educational Diversity offers a broad and balanced curriculum that supports a student in their spiritual, moral, cultural, emotional and physical development. Our starting point is the child and their individual needs. The curriculum boosts self esteem and raises aspirations. The importance of literacy and numeracy is emphasised, along with the acquisition of personal, learning, thinking and problem solving skills. Our aim is to re-engage the student and prepare them for the future so that they go on to achieve the best that they can and make a positive contribution.

Whilst each centre supports students with very different needs, the curriculum on offer is broadly the same.

KS3

Students in our KS3 centres will usually study: English, Mathematics, Humanities, ICT, Art, PSHE, PE and Science.

KS4

At our KS4 Centres, students will follow either a GCSE course, Functional Skills course, a vocational route or a combination of these. Subjects offered are: English, Mathematics, Art, History, ICT, PSHE, PE and Science.

Enrichment opportunities may also include working towards The Prince’s Trust, Duke of Edinburgh and the AQA Unit Award Scheme. All students receive guidance on ‘Mental Toughness’ and careers and may participate in extra-curricular activities in subjects like cooking, drama, journalism and music.

KS2

Pegasus is our KS2 centre. The curriculum offered aims to re-engage our learners, while following the National Curriculum expectations.

English

Summary

Assessments

Lower Key Stage 2: Years 3 and 4:

By the beginning of year 3, pupils should be able to read books written at an age-appropriate interest level. They should be able to read them accurately and at a speed that is sufficient for them to focus on understanding what they read rather than on decoding individual words. They should be developing their understanding and enjoyment of stories, poetry, plays and non-fiction, and learning to read silently. They should also be developing their knowledge and skills in reading non-fiction about a wide range of subjects. They should be learning to justify their views about what they have read: with support at the start of year 3 and increasingly independently by the end of year 4.

Pupils should be able to write down their ideas with a reasonable degree of accuracy and with good sentence punctuation. Teachers should therefore be consolidating pupils’ writing skills, their vocabulary, their grasp of sentence structure and their knowledge of linguistic terminology. Pupils should be beginning to understand how writing can be different from speech.

Pupils’ spelling of common words should be correct, including common exception words and other words that they have learnt. Pupils should spell words as accurately as possible using their phonic knowledge and other knowledge of spelling, such as morphology and etymology.

Upper key stage 2 – years 5 and 6

By the beginning of year 5, pupils should be able to read aloud a wider range of poetry and books written at an age-appropriate interest level with accuracy and at a reasonable speaking pace. They should be able to read most words effortlessly and to work out how to pronounce unfamiliar written words with increasing automaticity.

Pupils should be able to write down their ideas quickly. Their grammar and punctuation should be broadly accurate. Pupils’ spelling of most words taught so far should be accurate and they should be able to spell words that they have not yet been taught by using what they have learnt about how spelling words in English.

During years 5 and 6, teachers should continue to emphasise pupils’ enjoyment and understanding of language, especially vocabulary, to support their reading and writing. Pupils’ knowledge of language, gained from stories, plays, poetry, non-fiction and textbooks, will support their increasing fluency as readers, their facility as writers, and their comprehension. As in years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to enhance the effectiveness of their writing as well as their competence.

By the end of year 6, pupils’ reading and writing should be sufficiently fluent and effortless for them to manage the general demands of the curriculum in year 7, across all subjects and not just in English, but there will continue to be a need for pupils to learn subject-specific vocabulary. They should be able to reflect their understanding of the audience for and purpose of their writing by selecting appropriate vocabulary and grammar. Teachers should prepare pupils for secondary education by ensuring that they can consciously control sentence structure in their writing and understand why sentences are constructed as they are.

The above skills will be taught across a range of learning opportunities including those listed below:
Myths, Legends and traditional stories, Poetry, Stories from other cultures, Instructional texts, Descriptive writing, Chronological reports, Persuasive writing, Information texts, Play scripts, Film Narrative, Biographies, Older Literature.

Where appropriate, ‘Catch Up Literacy’ intervention will be delivered to students struggling to access the curriculum.

Half termly teacher assessments relating to the scheme of work for each half term.

Teachers use GL Assessments at the beginning and end of each year for all students to gauge age related progress.

Teachers also assess during three assessment windows across the year using the Climbing Frames Assessment Tool to measure progress by ability and age.

Mathematics

Summary

Assessments

KS2 maths covers a wide range of areas. Students develop their knowledge and understanding of number including becoming fluent in the four rules and place value. They are encouraged to solve problems using mental methods as well as written methods. Students learn how to collect and represent data, and study 2D and 3D shapes in more detail. The use of correct mathematical language is encouraged. The scheme of learning allows for work to be differentiated to a student’s ability and need and is focussed on closing the gap between outcomes and national expectations. Students are encouraged to become inquisitive learners, confident to try different strategies to solve problems and ready to accept the challenge that maths may sometimes give.

Termly teacher assessments

Learning Challenge

Summary

Assessments

Physical Geography including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes and the water cycle. Students will develop an understanding of settlements, land use, economic activity, including natural resources, especially energy and water supplies. Students will be taught to use the eight points of the compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and keys (including ordnance survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world. Opportunities are provided to use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

History: Students are taught historical investigation and enquiry skills whilst learning about key periods in history, including:The Roman Empire and the impact on Britain, Julius Caesar, Hadrian’s wall, Boudicca and the Romanisation of Britain. The achievements of the earliest civilizations - focussing upon the impact the Ancient Egyptians had on our society. Stone Age to the Iron Age: Hunter gatherers; Early farming; Bronze Age, and Iron Age.

Science: Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts including: nutrition needs of animals, including humans; the purpose of skeletons and muscles in humans and some other animals. The Solar System, including the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun; the movement of the moon relative to the Earth and will use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky. Students will develop skills of classification to group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment and will know that environments can change and how this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.

Religious Education: Students will have the opportunity to observe and consider different dimensions of religion, helping them to explore and develop an understanding of similarities and differences within and between different religions and worldviews. This includes exploring a range of beliefs, symbols and actions, observing different ways of life and ways of expressing meaning. Students will be given opportunities to develop their thinking skills by making connections between different features of the religious and worldviews they study, discovering more about celebrations, worship, pilgrimages and the rituals which mark important points in their life, in order to reflect on their significance.

Termly teacher assessments

PE

Summary

Assessments

At Key Stage 2 pupils will apply and develop a broad range of movements including: running, jumping, hopping, throwing and catching, learning how to use them in different ways and link them to actions and sequences of movement. Pupils will have the opportunity to apply such skills in isolation and in combination. Pupils will play competitive games including, badminton, basketball, cricket, dodgeball, rounders and tennis, and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending. Pupils will develop an understanding of communication and teamwork when competing with each other. Pupils will develop their flexibility, strength, control and balance through athletics and gymnastic style activities. Pupils will explore a range of movement patterns through a variety of activities. Pupils will compare their performance to previous experiences and demonstrate some knowledge and understanding of how to improve their personal performances.

Pupils will develop their confidence in the water through swimming lessons. Pupils will develop their swimming and water safety techniques. Pupils will use a range of activities to develop the swimming strokes, including: front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke. Pupils will explore self-rescue techniques in different water-based situations.

Termly teacher assessments

PSHE

Summary

Assessments

The programme of study is taught through daily morning sessions and is intended to enable young people to develop and gradually enrich their understanding of a set of overarching concepts:

Identity (their personal qualities, attitudes, skills, attributes and achievements and what influences these; understanding and maintaining boundaries around their personal privacy, including online)

Relationships (including different types and in different settings, including online)

A healthy (including physically, emotionally and socially), balanced lifestyle (including within relationships, work-life, exercise and rest, spending and saving and lifestyle choices)

Risk (identification, assessment and how to manage risk, rather than simply the avoidance of risk for self and others) and safety (including behaviour and strategies to employ in different settings, including online in an increasingly connected world

Diversity and equality (in all its forms, with due regard to the protected characteristics set out in the Equality Act 2010)

Rights (including the notion of universal human rights), responsibilities (including fairness and justice) and consent (in different contexts)

Change (as something to be managed) and resilience (the skills, strategies and ‘inner resources’ we can draw on when faced with challenging change or circumstance)

Power (how it is used and encountered in a variety of contexts including online; how it manifests through behaviours including bullying, persuasion, coercion and how it can be challenged or managed through negotiation and ‘win-win’ outcomes)

Career (including enterprise, employability and economic understanding)

Personal effectiveness

Self-improvement (including through constructive self-reflection, seeking and utilising constructive feedback and effective goal-setting)

Identifying unhelpful ‘thinking traps’ (e.g. generalisation and stereotyping)

Resilience (including self-motivation, perseverance and adaptability)

Self-regulation (including promotion of a positive, growth mind-set and managing strong emotions and impulses)

Recognising and managing peer influence and the need for peer approval,

Self-organisation (including time management)

Strategies for identifying and accessing appropriate help and support

Clarifying own values (including reflection on the origins of personal values

and beliefs) and re-evaluating values and beliefs in the light of new learning,

experiences and evidence

Recalling and applying knowledge creatively and in new situations

Developing and maintaining a healthy self-concept (including self-confidence, realistic self-image, self-worth, assertiveness, self-advocacy and self-respect)

Interpersonal and social effectiveness

Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour)

Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions

Discernment in evaluating the arguments and opinions of others (including challenging ‘group think’)

Skills for employability, including :

Active listening and communication (including assertiveness skills)

Team working

Negotiation (including flexibility, self-advocacy and compromise within an

awareness of personal boundaries)

Leadership skills

Presentation skills

Enterprise skills and attributes (e.g. aspiration, creativity, goal setting, identifying opportunities, taking positive risks)

Recognising, evaluating and utilising strategies for managing influence

Valuing and respecting diversity

Using these skills and attributes to build and maintain healthy relationships of all kinds

Mental Toughness and Teacher assessment

KS3

English

Summary

Assessments

Reading: Pupils should be taught to:

Develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently through: reading a wide range of fiction and non-fiction, including in particular whole books, short stories, poems and plays. They will be taught to understand increasingly challenging texts through:

-learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and

-understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries

-making inferences and referring to evidence in the text

-knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension -checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense

-read critically through: knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used

-studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these Writing: Pupils should be taught to: write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information through: writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences, including:

-well-structured narratives, scripts, poetry and other imaginative writing, personal and formal letters

-summarising and organising material, and supporting ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail

-applying their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form

-drawing on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing

-plan, draft, edit and proofread through:

-considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended

-paying attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling. Grammar and vocabulary: Pupils should be taught to: consolidate and build on their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary through:

-extending and applying the grammatical knowledge to the key stage 1 and 2 programmes of study to analyse more challenging texts

knowing and understanding the differences between spoken and written language, including differences associated with formal and informal registers, and between Standard English and other varieties of English

Spoken English: Pupils should be taught to: speak confidently and effectively, including through: using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion

Year 7 students will be taught the above skills through: Baseline Assessment
Formal / informal Letter writing, Research / Layout / format/ Style / Audience / Purpose, Spelling Test, Contemporary Novel, Holes / Skellig, Fictional/Creative Writing, First / third person narratives, Shakespeare Play, Non-fiction Writing.
Year 8 students will be taught the above skills through: Baseline Assessment: Formal / informal letter writing skills, Pre 1914 Reading Skills: TREASURE ISLAND, Descriptive Writing, Non-fiction Writing, Poetry, Comprehension skills, Decoding, locating, retrieving, using relevant information - Fictional/Creative Writing, First / third person narratives.

Year 9 students will be taught the above skills through:
Baseline Assessment: Narrative & fictional writing skills for GCSE, Contemporary Novel - Stone Cold, Non-fiction writing: Analysing non-fiction texts and writing for purpose, Media – Newspaper / Magazine articles, Types of Media / Target Audience / Layout / format / Style / writing for purpose, S&L presentations, Decoding, locating, retrieving, using relevant information - PEE, Poetry, Shakespeare Play, Descriptive Writing.

Where appropriate, ‘Catch Up Literacy’ intervention will be delivered to students struggling to access the curriculum.

Half termly teacher assessments relating to the scheme of work for each half term.

Teachers use GL Assessments at the beginning and end of each year for all students to gauge age related progress.

Teachers also assess during three assessment windows across the year using the Climbing Frames Assessment Tool to measure progress by ability and age.

Mathematics

Summary

Assessments

Students will follow a scheme of learning that will help them develop conceptual understanding and help them become fluent in mathematics. Students work on tasks which involve reasoning and problem solving. They are taught to break down problems into a series of simpler steps, persevering until a solution is found. Topics include number, ratio, proportion and rates of change, algebra, data handling, shape, space and measurement. Students are also given the opportunity to develop ‘functional maths’ skills by working on real life problems. Our aim is that students become happy mathematicians equipped with the skills to accept the challenge that maths can sometimes give, and confident to have a go at solving any problem.

Termly teacher assessments

Science

Summary

Assessments

To help prepare pupils for Key Stage 4, they are taught ‘10 Big Ideas’ which are: Forces, Electromagnetism, Energy, Waves, Matter, Reactions, Earth, Organisms, Ecosystems and Genes. These are the building blocks for the pupils to begin to gain a deeper understanding of these big ideas. The students will learn to work scientifically, and collect, analyse and present data. The pupils will learn to communicate their ideas methodically.

Termly teacher assessments

ICT

Summary

Assessments

Pupils are taught about the fundamental principles of computer science, which includes: abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation. Opportunities are provided to analyse and solve computer-based problems with practical experience of writing computer programs. Pupils are taught to evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, and to analytically solve problems. Emphasis is given to promoting e-safety, enabling our pupils to be responsible and safe users of information and communication technology.

Termly teacher assessments

History (Athena)

Summary

Assessments

Pupils are taught key aspects of the history of Britain as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day, considering how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. They will also be taught significant aspects of the history of the wider world, including: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; and achievements and follies of mankind. An emphasis is placed upon understanding abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’. Historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance are taught, enabling pupils to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Pupils are given opportunities for historical enquiry, understanding how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, while learning how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Pupils will be given opportunities to apply their learning and make connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Termly teacher assessments

Humanities (Pegasus)

Summary

Assessments

Geography

‘Location, Location, Location.’

Pupils will study and compare human and physical geography of 3 different countries in the world including China and Kenya.

They will have opportunities to extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries.

They will use maps of the world to explore Africa, Russia, Asia (including China and India), and the Middle East. There will be a focus upon the environmental regions, including polar and hot deserts, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities. Pupils will be taught to identify and understand geographical similarities, differences and links between places through the study of the human and physical geography of a region in Africa and a region in Asia.

‘Natural Disasters’

Pupils will study natural disasters(volcanoes, earthquakes and flooding) understanding why they occurred and how it has affected the location.

There is a focus upon physical geography relating to: geological timescales and plate tectonics; rocks, weathering and soils; weather and climate, including the change in climate from the Ice Age to the present; and glaciation, hydrology and coasts. Pupils will understand how human and physical processes interact to influence and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on the effective functioning of natural systems.

‘Mapping Skills’

Pupils learn to use ordnance survey maps to locate and navigate themselves around a local area. They have opportunity to build on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases, and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom and in the field. They will interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the classroom and the field, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs. Pupils will use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data. They will use fieldwork in contrasting locations to collect, analyse and draw conclusions from geographical data, using multiple sources of increasingly complex information.

History

‘Invasion, Plague and Murder!’

A study into the Norman Conquest, from the Battle of Hastings to the Peasants Revolt.

This topic explores the development of political power from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, including changes in the relationship between rulers and ruled over time, the changing relationship between the crown and parliament, and the development of democracy. Pupils will be taught to present and organise accounts and explanations about the past that are coherent, structured and substantiated, using chronological conventions and historical vocabulary. They will identify, select and use a range of historical sources, including textual, visual and oral sources, artefacts and the historic environment.

‘Henry VIII and the Church Reformation’

Pupils learn about Henry VIII and his decision to change the way Church worked in England.

This topic includes a study in Local History of a Local Church of England Church.

Pupils will explore the way in which the lives, beliefs, ideas and attitudes of people in Britain have changed over time and the factors – such as technology, economic development, war, religion and culture – that have driven these changes.

Pupils will have opportunity to identify and investigate, individually and as part of a team, specific historical questions or issues, making and testing hypotheses. They will be taught to reflect critically on historical questions or issues.

‘20th Century USA’

A study into the modern rights in USA, focussing on main figureheads including John F Kennedy (JFK) and Martin Luther King.

This topic invites pupils to consider the impact of significant political, social, cultural, religious, technological and/or economic developments and events on past European and world societies. Pupils are taught to recognise the changing nature of conflict and cooperation between countries and peoples and its lasting impact on national, ethnic, racial, cultural or religious issues.

Termly teacher assessments

PE

Summary

Assessments

At Key Stage 3 pupils will extend their physical developments and skills learned in Key Stage 2. Pupils will expand on their movement vocabulary to become more confident in their techniques and apply them across different sports and physical activities. Pupils will use a range of tactics and strategies to develop their own performance and challenge others in individual and team games including: badminton, basketball, dodgeball, cricket, rounders, table tennis and tennis. Pupils will use a variety of differentiated activities to develop their technique and improve performance in other competitive sports including athletics and gymnastic style activities. Pupils will use teamwork and problem solving tasks to develop their communication skills, and collaboratively approach to work in team. Pupils will analyse their performances and compare to previous experiences. Pupils will have the opportunity to attend Extra-Curricular activities, and be encouraged to participate in sports outside of the school environment through community links.

Termly teacher assessments

Art

Summary

Assessments

Pupils are taught to develop their creativity and ideas, and increase proficiency in their execution. They develop a critical understanding of the arts expressing reasoned judgements that can inform their own work.

Pupils are taught to use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks as a basis for exploring their ideas, to use a range of techniques and media, including painting, to increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials, to analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work, and also taught about the history of art.

Termly teacher assessments

PSHE

Summary

Assessments

Pupils are encouraged to explore a variety of topics relating to their personal, social and health development and are given opportunities to form opinions and discuss ideas and listen to the points of view of others. Key topics covered include: self-awareness, focusing on building confidence, raising self-esteem and increasing their overall resilience. Personal target setting, aiming to improve ‘Mental Toughness’ and taking some control of future actions by choosing simple personal challenges and recognising what commitment means in practice. Rights and responsibilities with a specific focus upon bullying, cyber-bullying and having safe, healthy relationships online. Managing emotions, learning strategies and techniques to help them take control, developing their emotional literacy and resilience. Healthy lifestyles, including alcohol and drugs. Healthy relationships, including sexual health. There is a focus on taking control in personal relationships and managing risk in terms of sexual behaviour, including online activity.

Termly teacher assessments

KS4

English

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

GCSE English Language

GCSE English Literature (In some circumstances)

Eduqas / WJEC

Eduqas / WJEC

3 Elements: 2 linear exams in June of year 11 and a Spoken Language Presentation - sent to the exam board for moderation by the 5th May 2018.

Functional Skills

Entry Level 1, 2 & 3

Level 1 & 2

In order to achieve each level of qualification students must pass a reading and writing exam as well as 2 speaking & listening assessments.

Edexcel

8 opportunities throughout the year

Course description:

Component 1: 20th Century Literature Reading and Creative Prose Writing:

Written examination: 1 hour 45 mins.

Section A (20%) – Reading Understanding of one prose extract (about 60-100 lines) of literature from the 20th century assessed through a range of structured questions.

Section B (20%) – Prose Writing One creative writing task selected from a choice of four titles.

Component 2: 19th and 21st Century Non-Fiction Reading and Transactional/Persuasive Writing: Written examination: 2 hours.

Section A (30%) – Reading Understanding of two extracts (about 900-1200 words in total) of high-quality non-fiction writing, one from the 19th century, the other from the 21st century, assessed through a range of structured questions.

Section B (30%) – Writing Two compulsory transactional/persuasive writing tasks.

Component 3: Spoken Language Assessment - Filmed Presentation - Non-Weighted but compulsory

One presentation/speech, including responses to questions and feedback

Achievement in Spoken Language will be reported as part of the qualification listed as Distinction, Merit or Pass, but it will not form part of the final mark and grade.

Aims and Objectives:

The WJEC Eduqas GCSE in English language builds on the tradition and reputation WJEC has established for clear, reliable assessment supported by straightforward, accessible guidance and administration.
WJEC has been mindful to include the following features: opportunities for flexible teaching approaches questions and tasks designed to enable candidates to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do straightforward wording of questions accessibility of materials across the ability range opportunities for breadth of study use of ‘unseen’ material for analysis in external assessment focused assessment of specific language skills opportunities for producing extended writing high-quality examination and resource materials.
It enables learners to: read a wide range of texts, fluently and with good understanding read critically, and use knowledge gained from wide reading to inform and improve their own writing write effectively and coherently using Standard English appropriately use grammar correctly, punctuate and spell accurately acquire and apply a wide vocabulary, alongside a knowledge and understanding of grammatical terminology,1 and linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language.
In addition, it enables learners to: listen to and understand spoken language, and use spoken Standard English effectively.
Spoken language will be reported on as part of the qualification, but it will not form part of the final mark and grade.
In designing this specification, careful consideration of length of examination time and the number of question papers has ensured a balance between robust assessment and manageability. Varied question types and clear rubric aim to make this untiered assessment accessible to learners of different abilities.

Functional Skills English:

Functional skills study is embedded within the GCSE course so as to maximise the opportunitites for students to gain qualifications at a range of levels.

Where appropriate, ‘Catch Up Literacy’ intervention will be delivered to students struggling to access the curriculum.

Mathematics

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

Entry Level Certificate

AQA

Assessments throughout the year.

Entry Level Functional skills mathematics

Edexcel

8 opportunities throughout the year

Level 1 and 2 Functional skills mathematics

Edexcel

8 opportunities throughout the year

Level 1 and 2 Awards in mathematics

(Number and Measure)

Edexcel

January and May

GCSE Mathematics

Edexcel

June

Course description:

Students will continue to improve the skills which have been developed during their KS3 studies. They will follow a scheme of learning best suited to their individual needs. Topics studied include number, ratio, proportion and rates of change, algebra, data handling, shape, space and measurement. They also continue to develop their functional skills in maths by solving problems with a real life context. Gaps within a student’s mathematical learning journey are identified and students are supported to overcome these difficulties. Our aim is to develop a love of maths, as well as developing confident, fluent mathematicians who are able to interpret and analyse information, simplify, think and solve problems, persevere, assess risk and make informed decisions.

ICT

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

Entry Level Functional Skills

OCR

1.5hr Exam with 3 opportunities throughout the year.

Level 1 and 2 Functional Skills

OCR

2hr Exam with 4 opportunities throughout the year.

Course description:

Students will continue to improve the skills which have been developed during their KS3 studies. They will follow a scheme of learning best suited to their individual needs. Skills taught include: identifying the ICT requirements needed to solve simple and complex tasks; applying a range of techniques to a variety of applications leading to technical demand outcomes; making informed choices and knowing when to seek guidance; analysing multi-step tasks and separating the components and developing confidence to achieve both guided and independent outcomes. Alongside the technical ICT curriculum, emphasis is given to online safety.

Science

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

GCSE Science

AQA

June

Course description:

AQA science introduces students to the fundamentals of science, covering all three sciences: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The skills the students will learn will have a wider value in their lives and careers and include: using knowledge and understanding to pose scientific questions and define science problems; evaluating data, evidence and methodology; understanding the relationship between science and society and finally developing communication skills. A broad range of topics are taught, making connections to many aspects of the world we live in. The students learn each subject separately, helping them understand the key aspects of the different subjects. It is our aim that all students will be inspired and challenged as they progress through this course.

Art

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

GCSE

AQA

Termly teacher formative assessments followed by end of course summary assessment

Unit Award

AQA

Summary assessment

Course description:

GCSE Art utilises a skills-based approach designed to allow students to develop knowledge and understanding during the course through a variety of learning experiences and approaches, including engagement with sources. This allows students to develop the skills to explore, create and communicate their own ideas visually. Students will demonstrate these skills through the development, refinement, recording, realisation and presentation of their ideas through a portfolio and by responding to an externally set assignment.

Unit Award also utilises this skills-based approach towards the completion of a selected AQA short programme of study.

History

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

GCSE

AQA

Termly teacher assessments

Course description:

The subject content for GCSE History states that the scope of study should include history:

● from three eras:

○ Medieval (500–1500)

○ Early Modern (1450–1750)

○ Modern (1700–present day)

● on three timescales:

○ short (depth study)

○ medium (period study)

○ long (thematic study)

● on three geographical contexts:

○ a locality (the historic environment)

○ British

○ European and/or wider world settings.

British history must form a minimum of 40% of the assessed content over the full course.

One thematic study
This enables students to understand change and continuity across a long sweep of history. The study must cover all three specified eras.

One period study
This allows students to focus on a substantial and coherent medium time span of at least 50 years. The study will require students to understand an unfolding narrative of substantial developments and issues. The period study can be from any of the specified eras.

Two depth studies
One British and one European/wider world. Depth studies enable students to focus on a substantial and coherent short time span. The studies enable students to gain understanding of the complexities of a society or historical situation and the interplay of different aspects within it. Depth studies must be taken from different eras.

A study of the historic environment
The study of the historic environment should focus on a particular site in its historical context and enable students to study the relationship between a place and historical events and developments. There is no requirement to visit the site. This study can be linked to any other part of the course or may stand alone.

Paper 1: [ 1hr 45mins exam]

● Section A: 1B Germany 1890 - 1945 Democracy and Dictatorship, [6 compulsory questions]

● Section B: Conflict and Tension 1818-1939 [4 compulsory questions]

Paper 2: [ 1hr 45mins exam]

● Section A: 2A Britain: Health and the People [4 compulsory questions]

● Section B: Elizabethan England [4 compulsory questions]

PE

Summary

Exam Board

Assessment

At Key Stage 4 pupils will explore more complex and physical activities to develop their individual and team performances. Pupils will experience a range of activities to develop personal fitness and promote an active, healthy lifestyle. Pupils will use and develop a variety of tactics and strategies to develop their own performance and challenge others in individual and team games including: badminton, basketball, dodgeball, cricket, rounders, table tennis and tennis. Pupils will use a variety of differentiated activities to develop their technique and improve performance in other competitive sports including athletics and gymnastic style activities. Pupils will use teamwork and problem solving tasks to develop intellectual competence and leadership qualities, in individual and group activities. Pupils will evaluate their and others performance, and suggest ways to improve. Pupils will complete a variety of AQA Units Awards. Pupils will have the opportunity to attend Extra-Curricular activities, and be encouraged to participate in sports outside of the school environment through community links.

AQA

Termly teacher assessments

PSHE

Level

Exam Board

Assessment

Entry Level 2, 3

Level 1, 2

AQA

Assessments completed throughout each topic, with final assessed work sent for moderation during May.

Course description:

Building upon the PSHE curriculum taught at KS3, pupils continue to explore a variety of topics relating to their personal, social and health development with an additional focus upon preparing our students for their futures, post-16. Pupils are expected to be able to research and have discussions with others about key topics as they develop and form their own opinions whilst listening to and valuing the point of view of others. Key topics covered include: Healthy Lifestyles, including both physical and mental health and taking responsibility for own health choices; Emotional Wellbeing, including the impact of discrimination, equal opportunities, bullying, use of social media as well as exploring strategies and techniques to support own emotional health; Drugs Education, focusing on legal and illegal drugs and the associated laws; Sex and Relationship Education, including healthy and unhealthy relationships and what can cause breakdowns such as divorce, intimate relationships and contraception choices, sexually transmitted diseases and the role of a parent; Personal Safety, focusing on assessing and managing risks in the home, online and in the workplace; Personal Action Planning, setting goals to help improve success both at school and beyond; Applying for jobs and courses, with opportunities to practice writing application forms and carry out interviews.

Throughout KS4, students will attend a Careers Fair and meet with college coaches as they explore and choose their post-16 path.

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